Julie Duffy

  • How To Write A StoryADay For A Month
    I. Use the site during the StoryADay May challenge, to find prompts and to find community (either in the blog post comments or in the community forums. (Come back on April 2 […]

  • This week I talk about the different cycles we go through in a creative life: fertile and fallow, frenzied and fatigued…and how you can make the most of them.   Also in this show: concrete steps for preparing […]

  • In which I encourage you to write Flash Fiction and tell you about an upcoming online workshop.

    The online workshop will happen on April 22, 2017 from 4 PM until late.

    There are 10 tickets for full […]

  • How Do You Write A StoryADay For A Month?

    First of all let’s start with the better question:

    Why write a story a day for a month?

    It’s not to write 31 brilliant stories that will instantly get publ […]

  • Q. How do I start writing again after a long time?

    A.
    Keep your expectations low. Don’t expect to produce a masterpiece, or even a coherent story.

    Set goals like “freewriting three mornings a week for 20 […]

  • That sounds like a great plan for building (reading and) writing into your life. Good for you!!

    Yes, you’re naive, but that’s a wonderful thing. I’m old and jaded and STILL excited for May 🙂

  • Somehow I’ve never really got to grips with what CampNano is about (probably because I’ve been getting ready for StoryADay every year since before it started). Must get more informed!

    Question on Patreon: Do you find it worthwhile? I think I might find it quite anxiety-inducing. Or I might find it exhilarating to know people were waiting to…[Read more]

  • Awesome!

    Are you posting the poems online? Post a link here and let us check them out!

  • Sounds good.

    Did you, by any chance, take the FutureLearn Digital Storytelling class? I did part of that a while ago. It was interesting.

    I definitely advocate leaving chapters and scenes in the ‘too difficult’ basket. Sometimes it turns out you’re resisting them because they are difficult, sometimes it turns out that you’re resisting them…[Read more]

  • Sounds great!
    I’m glad you’re finding a process that allows for flexibility. I’m a bit of a binger and a sprinter, myself!

    Isn’t it amazing how different stories look a couple of years later? 😉

  • Fantastic!
    Great news on the story submissions and on finding helpful courses online!
    See? You’re inspiring us this month 🙂

  • Agreed! It’s so easy to put your writing last, or think it doesn’t matter. When you have writing friends, someone’s always going through a good spell that inspires you, or is asking for advice, and you find you know the answer…it’s just encouraging to be with other writers.

  • My first clue should have been that this story was published in Nightmare Magazine.

    This is a fabulous story: original, chilling, populated with compelling characters, with a strong narrative arc and an […]

  • Every month we gather here to discuss what we’ve achieved and commit to making more progress in our creative lives in the coming month. We call it our   Serious Writer’s Accountability Group or SWAGr, for short! […]

    • So… my brain looked at my March goals and was like ‘how ’bout we have a depressive period instead’. Aside from sending out ‘featherweight’ again, to a place that told me it was clichéd. Ouch.
      Only really good thing I did (aside from doing my best on the job transfer, which is taking frustratingly long) was join on online writing group with my new housemate that’s had a really positive energy so far. I just had my first good writing day in a while, so fingers crossed it’ll continue! This month I’ll try to:
      – write a bunch on my main novel project; I’m aiming for 30k with a stretch goal of 40k
      – get some feedback on my almost-finished short story to see if I can get rid of my writer’s block on it
      – keep looking for another place ‘featherweight’ might fit.

      • Finding a good group of other writers is such a helpful thing, though. The usefulness of feedback and just all around support can’t be overstated 🙂

        • Agreed! It’s so easy to put your writing last, or think it doesn’t matter. When you have writing friends, someone’s always going through a good spell that inspires you, or is asking for advice, and you find you know the answer…it’s just encouraging to be with other writers.

    • I know March has 31 days, but it seemed to vanish in the blink of an eye! Well, I managed to finish a chapter of my novel, which was a hangover from February. I finished my two online courses which technically had nothing to do with writing, although the film making one was good at seeing how stories can be told in so many different ways and gave me further insight in writing scripts. I re-worked another of my earlier short stories and submitted to a competition. I started the next chapter of the novel but that is currently on hold. I’ve sketched out each of the remaining chapters so I know where it’s going, I just need to write them now.

      I think for this month I’ll start the next chapter and leave the current one in the ‘too difficult’ basket. It may work out easier when I’ve written more. I’m also planning a new short story aimed at another competition for the end of May, so I have some time to think about it.

      • Sounds good.

        Did you, by any chance, take the FutureLearn Digital Storytelling class? I did part of that a while ago. It was interesting.

        I definitely advocate leaving chapters and scenes in the ‘too difficult’ basket. Sometimes it turns out you’re resisting them because they are difficult, sometimes it turns out that you’re resisting them because they can be replaced with something else (which becomes clear when you’ve written more of the story). Keep ploughing forward!

    • April is the month I write a poem a day, which is a worthy warmup for Story-a-Day May.

      Meanwhile, I’m still writing at least a couple of stories a week and hope to finish revising (my most difficult skill) my first story collection.

    • Fantastic!
      Great news on the story submissions and on finding helpful courses online!
      See? You’re inspiring us this month 🙂

    • Sounds great!
      I’m glad you’re finding a process that allows for flexibility. I’m a bit of a binger and a sprinter, myself!

      Isn’t it amazing how different stories look a couple of years later? 😉

    • Somehow I’ve never really got to grips with what CampNano is about (probably because I’ve been getting ready for StoryADay every year since before it started). Must get more informed!

      Question on Patreon: Do you find it worthwhile? I think I might find it quite anxiety-inducing. Or I might find it exhilarating to know people were waiting to hear from me…How do you like it?

      I find goal-setting-sessions and to-do lists invaluable for reducing anxiety about All The Things hanging over me. Actually that’s a good reminder…I’m off to do some planning!

    • That sounds like a great plan for building (reading and) writing into your life. Good for you!!

      Yes, you’re naive, but that’s a wonderful thing. I’m old and jaded and STILL excited for May 🙂

  • In the last of my publication-related writing prompts, we sound a note of optimism, courtesy of Helios Quarterly Magazine.

    Stories for this market should ‘illuminate the dark’, and examine the human […]

  • Sticking with this month’s theme of writing for publication, today I bring you another prompt associated with a themed issue.

    This time it’s for flash fiction from Splickety Magazine. This pays 2 cents per […]

  • Oh, this one made me laugh.

    Not just for the unexpected ending, but for the constant, very modern thoughts that crowded my head as I was reading it.

    Basically, this is the story of a ruthless old king who, […]

  • This week’s prompt comes from Mad Scientist Journal who are putting together a special edition with a theme that really tickles me!

    The Prompt
    Write the fictionalized story of an unusual building 

    When I […]

  • Often, when I talk about how to write a short story, I get caught up in talking about traditional, narrative tales that might be structured in a similar way to a novel.

    But one of the things I love about short […]

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