Julie Duffy

  • Sticking with this month’s theme of writing for publication, today I bring you another prompt associated with a themed issue.

    This time it’s for flash fiction from Splickety Magazine. This pays 2 cents per […]

  • Oh, this one made me laugh.

    Not just for the unexpected ending, but for the constant, very modern thoughts that crowded my head as I was reading it.

    Basically, this is the story of a ruthless old king who, […]

  • This week’s prompt comes from Mad Scientist Journal who are putting together a special edition with a theme that really tickles me!

    The Prompt
    Write the fictionalized story of an unusual building 

    When I […]

  • Often, when I talk about how to write a short story, I get caught up in talking about traditional, narrative tales that might be structured in a similar way to a novel.

    But one of the things I love about short […]

  • Yeah, February was tough for me. It always is because both my kids’ birthdays take over (even though one was born in early March) and the lack of daylight always affects me badly. Add in the political WTFs of this past month has chewed up a lot of my reading/writing time as I struggle to stay sane (I try to stick to writing topics in my posts here…[Read more]

  • Good luck with the job search and with the submissions.

    Hopefully you’ll have been inspired by Ray (above) committing to sending out rejected pieces within 24 hours. I think that’s a great policy 🙂

  • If it’s any consolation, I always find these kinds of challenges really tough to get through until about Day 15. If you can make it to Day 15 you can probably make it the whole way!

    So, Day 8, how’s it going?

  • Good stuff. Sounds like you have some positive, measurable steps in there and are planning for Life to happen too. Good for you.

  • Sounds like you did pretty well with those ambitious goals! And I like the sound of the not-short-story that you started!

    I’m a little behind with my own #12for12Stories efforts. Februrary’s did not happen. But I hope to catch up this month.

  • Love that goal!

    Do you use Duotrope too? I find a ton of interesting markets and themed deadlines here (I’m sharing some as writing prompts this month)

  • Good luck with these. Small, manageable goals are definitely useful and get us in the habit of good work.
    I saw this post from Seth Godin yesterday, that plays into the same idea: Drip by Drip And The Thunderclap

  • In keeping with this month’s theme of “Publication”, this prompt comes from a market that is actively looking for short stories right now!

    The Prompt
    Write a Fairytale With The Theme “Diamonds & […]

  • From Stories of Your Life by Ted Chiang

    This is the (long) short story that was the basis for the movie Arrival, a movie I loved.

    I read the story after seeing the movie, and it was a little hard to separate […]

  • This month is all about publishing; how, why, and why not.  I don’t talk much about publishing at StoryADay because the focus has always been on creativity. However, seven years in, I think we could stand to talk […]

  • Every month we gather here to discuss what we’ve achieved and commit to making more progress in our creative lives in the coming month. We call it our   Serious Writer’s Accountability Group or SWAGr, for short! […]

    • After two very hard months, I’m so ready to get back to writing again.

      My current goals:

      Use the SWAGr worksheet to keep myself on-goal
      Start posting snippets of work on Patreon
      Write down at least one new idea a week
      Finish one WIP
      One blog post

      Small goals, but if I can manage these I’m in good shape.

      Hope everybody’s goals go well!

      • Great goals for yourself! You sound like you are in the same place I am right now, ready to get back to it. Have a great month, I look forward to hearing about your progress when we check in again in April.

      • Good luck with these. Small, manageable goals are definitely useful and get us in the habit of good work.
        I saw this post from Seth Godin yesterday, that plays into the same idea: Drip by Drip And The Thunderclap

    • I have taken too much time away from writing the last four months and March is about getting back to it.

      Write a new first draft of a short story.
      Finish revising my WIP that I last touched in October.
      Create a schedule of dates that I will dedicate hours to my writing work.
      Schedule artist’s dates.
      Register for a nearby Festival of the Short Story and book lodgings.

      These things matter to me because my fiction writing has been neglected for the past four months while I answered some big questions about my vision for my life.

      Other things happening in March include my birthday and March Break. I will be spending as much time with my family as I can during that week, so I will have to be vigilant about scheduling writing time as well for that week, even just an hour.

      • Good stuff. Sounds like you have some positive, measurable steps in there and are planning for Life to happen too. Good for you.

    • You are working hard on your goals, even when it doesn’t work out as you set out. Keep on keeping on!

    • So I didn’t get 100% of my February goals, which is probably to be expected seeing how busy I was (we made the move successfully; I would not wish the Greyhound bus service on my worst enemy, though). I did get some practice using Duotrope, but I couldn’t quite finish ‘Mortmain’.

      So this month:
      – I’ll attempt to finish and send out ‘Mortmain’.
      – If possible, complete a rough draft of another short story
      – ‘featherweight’ just got rejected, so I need to send that somewhere else
      – and in nonwriting news, I’ll be following up with my old job’s location in this area and try to make them hire me. Fingers crossed.

      • Good luck with the job search and with the submissions.

        Hopefully you’ll have been inspired by Ray (above) committing to sending out rejected pieces within 24 hours. I think that’s a great policy 🙂

    • Love that goal!

      Do you use Duotrope too? I find a ton of interesting markets and themed deadlines here (I’m sharing some as writing prompts this month)

    • Sounds like you did pretty well with those ambitious goals! And I like the sound of the not-short-story that you started!

      I’m a little behind with my own #12for12Stories efforts. Februrary’s did not happen. But I hope to catch up this month.

    • If it’s any consolation, I always find these kinds of challenges really tough to get through until about Day 15. If you can make it to Day 15 you can probably make it the whole way!

      So, Day 8, how’s it going?

    • Yeah, February was tough for me. It always is because both my kids’ birthdays take over (even though one was born in early March) and the lack of daylight always affects me badly. Add in the political WTFs of this past month has chewed up a lot of my reading/writing time as I struggle to stay sane (I try to stick to writing topics in my posts here and to avoid being divisive here, but I don’t think it’s too partisan to say “WTF?” about some of the stuff that’s going on at the moment…)

      Anyhoo, throw in a little thyroid surgery, and my month went a bit off the rails. (Anesthetic and pain mess with your attention span, apparently.)

      However, I’m happy to report that I produced some content for the site that I was really happy with, and I got back on the podcasting wagon a mere week after someone slit my throat with a surgical scalpel, which felt like a huge win 😉

      This month I’m going to commit to very little:

      * Write one short story for the #12For12Stories Challenge
      * Write one big (or several smaller) posts for the Publishing Theme Of The Month
      * Post 4 writing prompts with associated publishing deadlines
      * Critique work for some writing friends
      * Work on the StoryADay ebook A Month Of Writing Prompts 2017
      * I’m also going to write Morning Pages every week day instead of staring at my phone.
      * Doing my taxes!

      OK, that’s not nothing, but still.

  • Thanks Karen. It’s tough when life gets in the way!

    Here’s a technique that might help you urn that “writing bits and thinking” into productive writing time: keep planning and breaking down the novel into “scenes that need to be written”. Then, when you have a little time & energy for writing, pick a scene and ask: ‘why does this need to be…[Read more]

  • Last week I talked about reading and writing stories with divided storylines that come together at the end.

    The example I gave, Shakedown by Elizabeth Gonzalez, had a fairly traditional narrative structure. […]

  • Hi Joe,

    Sorry for getting back to you so late, but I HIGHLY recommend learnscrivenerfast.com. It’s video based (which I don’t always love) but this works REALLY well. His vids are short and targeted and explain both how and why you might do a thing in Scrivener.

    How are the story-a-week stories coming along? (Accountability, remember?)

  • Congrats on the great reception for the new box set and novel.

    I’ve got a similar mailing list goal. We should compare notes. It’s hard NOT to get distracted by that.

  • I love it. I didn’t love it until I used it for a non-fiction project and came to understand the value of having all the different files.

    Then I wrote an novel in it, using a new file for each scene. It was such a GIFT when it came to tweaking and moving things around while editing. No more scrolling for a huge Word file, that hangs and…[Read more]

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