Praying by Bear Creek by Charlotte Neussle

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About the Story

Oregon’s natural beauty flows through its creeks to the sea. It carries evergreen prayers, as timely now as for aboriginal peoples. In this story, follow some of those prayers home.

About the Author

Writing is a friend that has been gently nudging me to speak. Now as a participant in StoryADay, I’ve committed myself to writing memoir, using a process to bring forth perspective, healing and wholeness. Engaging in this process and belonging to this group all came at just the right time. Read more about me at charlottenuessle.com/about-charlotte

Dissolve And Gather by Monique Cuillerier

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About the Story

At the height of summer, in the midst of a pandemic, a woman searches for respite.

About the Author

Monique Cuillerier has gained a lot through participating in Story A Day over the last nine years, not least of which is a deep attachment to writing short fiction. She mostly writes science fiction, although some of her work is difficult to categorize. When not writing, she runs, gardens, knits, and organizes large online events.

About Straps by Margo A. Mertz

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About the Story

I thought only good things would happen once we removed the top part of our wool jumper…I didn’t expect to be “the girl in the undershirt.” That’s not fair!

About the Author

Margo Artale Mertz has lived in Burlington, Vermont for the last 30 years. She spent her first 10 years in Brooklyn, NY, the next 11 in Pittsburgh, PA, and the following 7 in New Rochelle, NY. She writes humor in short fictions, creative non-fictions, and essays. She has participated in several StoryADay critique groups and challenges, and can’t thank Julie enough.

100 by Natalie Goodwin

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About the Story

A 100 word story about One and his brothers Aught and Naught

About the Author

I’m a writer of fantasy, mystery, suspense, and sometimes literary fiction. My favorite authors are Neil Gaiman and Janie Chang. For this story, I wanted to pick a number and write a story about it. I chose the number 100 with the goal of writing the story in exactly 100 words.

Part of:

StoryFest 2020 Logo

Lesson Plans by Michele Reisinger

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About the Story

A novice teacher facing burn-out must learn the most valuable lessons aren’t necessarily the ones we teach.

About the Author

Michele E. Reisinger lives with her family near Philadelphia and teaches English at a New Jersey High School. Her short fiction has been featured online at Light and Dark Magazine, Prometheus Dreaming, 34th Parallel, The Mighty Line, and Dreamers Creative Writing, as well as the 2019 anthology Stories That need to be told. She loves to read stories that make her think and wonder and learn. Lesson Plans was inspired by StoryADay’s list prompt and her conversation with a burned-out colleague who questioned the value of careers in education. Michele credits StoryADay and its awesome community of fellow writers with encouraging her along every step of her writing journey. You can find more of her writing at My Name Was Supposed To Be Elizabeth Ann (mereisinger.com).

StoryFest 2020: How to Participate

This is our chance to celebrate all our hard work, either by nominating one of your stories to be featured during StoryFest, or by sharing the stories of your fellow StoryADay writers.

StoryFest 2020

June 27-28

storyaday.org

WHAT IS STORYFEST?

StoryFest is a weekend when the stories take over StoryADay.org.

On Jun 27, the front page of StoryADay.org will change to one dedicated to you and your stories. It will be full of links to your stories, online, until June 28

It’s our end-of-year party, our recital, our chance to share our work with readers.

(It’s also my birthday month, so consider your participation as your birthday gift to me!)

HOW TO CELEBRATE STORYFEST

  • If you wrote even one story in this (or any previous) StoryADay, submit one to be featured on the site’s front page June 27-28.
  • Whether or not you submit a story you can help spread the word: from now until StoryFest, tell everyone you know on every social network (especially the ones with readers in them) about StoryFest. Tell them to come to the site June 27-28 to read new and exciting work by up-and-coming future stars of the literary world!
  • Post the graphic on your blog, your Facebook timeline, tattoo it on your leg, whatever! (Get your graphics here)
  • Come to the site June 27-28, follow a link to a story, read it and comment on it.

HOW TO SUBMIT/NOMINATE A STORY

Simple.

Continue reading “StoryFest 2020: How to Participate”