Writer’s Clue – Writing Prompt from LJ Cohen

LJ Cohen brings us a fabulous writing prompt today, for Day 4 of the challenge.

This is an example of how you can put limits on your writing options, to increase your chances of getting your writing DONE on a day when it seems impossible.

I know, it sounds counterintuitive, right? Limits make things easier?

But it’s true (you can Google it. Lots of experts say too much choice is a bad thing!).

Play along with LJ today, as she encourages you to fill in the blanks, and then flesh out a story from your notes.

The Prompt

Let’s play Writer’s Clue! Stories are about a person in a place with a problem. We can use the basic structure (modified to inject conflict) from the game.
For this story, write about Mx [1. a non-gendered title, in case you’re wondering. Now I’m wondering how to pronounce it…].___________ in the _________ room with a __________.
You can choose ordinary places or objects, or magical ones, you can set your story in the past, present, or future. It doesn’t need to follow the plot structure of the game in that there’s a murder you are solving; this is just a way to give a story a kick start.
For example, from one of my stories: Ms. Ro Maldonado in the derelict ship’s bridge with a malfunctioning AI. Change any one of the choices, and you have a different story.

About LJ Cohen

LJ Cohen is a fan of the Red Sox, Doctor Who & local food. A physical therapist for over 25 years, she now uses her clinical skills to hurt characters. She describes herself as a relentless optimist, potter, poet, and science fiction and fantasy writer. You can find her novels in all the usual places. PARALLAX, book 4 of her science fiction series Halcyone Space will be available summer of 2017. http://www.ljcohen.net
Don’t forget to check out LJ’s books and to leave a comment or post in The Victory Dance Group to tell us how it’s going!

8 thoughts on “Writer’s Clue – Writing Prompt from LJ Cohen”

  1. I struggled with this, it had very much a sci-fi (should that be Star Wars?) feel to me, and I’m not a fan of either. I came up with Mx Valurdem in the pressurised air lock with an anti matter particle weapon after much shuffling of letters for the name. In the end I did a bit more of my competition short story.

    1. The beauty of this method is it can be used for any genre. Sometimes I make a list of names, places, and problems/things and randomly pick one from each column to kickstart a story.

  2. Yes! Limits are actually helpful. I had this brought home to me in my twenties after I returned to the States from the Peace Corps.

    Seems like this would be a good prompt for a scene in a novel too. You know, for when you get stuck and can’t decide what to write next.

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